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August 23, 2013

Thailand

I&V Bio’s New Brine Shrimp Product–Questions and Answers

 

On August 12, 2013, I posted a story about I&V Bio’s new brine shrimp product to this page.  Soon thereafter, I received the following email from Durwood Dugger, a shrimp/lobster farming consultant in Florida, USA:

 

The I&V Bio brine shrimp product is quite interesting.  I would like to know more about it.  Can you answer the following questions?

 

1. How much does the product cost?

 

2. What's the source of I&V Bio’s Artemia cysts?

 

3. What’s the fatty acid profile of the Artemia nauplii—and its variance over time?  Not all Artemia sub-species are desirable for shrimp larval feeds because their fatty acid profiles and essential nutrients are highly variable.  The enrichment may, or may not, overcome this potential issue.  Fatty acid profile deviation is a problem for current cyst suppliers because cyst sources change and because there are seasonal effects on the nutritional profiles of cysts.

 

4. What is the basis of I&V Bio’s “contamination and Vibrio free” claim?  What types of contamination does it test for?  Does it use continuous or large batch testing?  Also, it would be interesting to know if any viral particle testing is done?

 

5. I have to wonder just how large this market might be and how it might be limited by delivery logistics—especially in Southeast Asia.

 

6. Have any of the big hatcheries in Thailand adopted I&V Bio’s product?

 

 

Answers

 

I submitted Dugger’s questions to Frank Indigne, one of the founders of I&V Bio, and got some great answers:

 

1. How much does the product cost?

 

Prices will be very competitive with Artemia cyst pricing.  Price variations between countries will depend on shipping, duties, hatchery locations and delivery areas.

 

2. What is the source of I&V Bio’s Artemia cysts?

 

Russia and Utah’s Great Salt Lake in the United States.

 

3. What’s the fatty acid profileof the Artemia nauplii—and its variance over time?  Not all Artemia sub-species are desirable for shrimp larval feeds because their fatty acid profiles and essential nutrients are highly variable.  I&V Bio’s enrichment may, or may not, overcome this potential issue.  Fatty acid profile deviation is a problem for current cyst suppliers because cyst sources change and because there are seasonal effects on the nutritional profiles of cysts.

 

A) Indeed, variance in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA, not present) depend on the source, but also on harvest period and harvest year.  EPA levels can be between 3 and 25 mg/g.  Artemia cysts with high levels of EPA (20-25mg/g) are sold at prices over $200 per kilogram!

 

B) Nevertheless, it is absolutely important to use enriched nauplii as soon as possible.  Most, if not all Artemia cyst suppliers don’t mention the EPA levels on their packaging.  Our enrichment will boost EPA by at least 10mg/g and DHA by 25mg/g with a total highly unsaturated fatty acid(HUFA) value higher than 35mg/g, which is far better than any non-enriched nauplii (3-25mg/g).

 

C) I&V Bio will focus on supplying enriched nauplii because it is extremely difficult for hatcheries to control Vibrio and maintain minimum dissolved oxygen levels in the hatching tank.

 

4. What is the basis of I&V Bio’s “contamination and Vibrio free” claim?  What types of contamination does it test for?  Does it use continuous or large batch testing?  Also, it would be interesting to note if any viral particle testing is done?

 

A) We use thiosulfate citrate bile salt sucrose agar (TCBS agar) medium for testing our disinfected sea water, fresh water and Artemia nauplii paste.  Only Vibrio species can grow on TCBS agar.

 

B) For viruses we use PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests.  We test for WSSV (whitespot syndrome virus), YHV (yellowhead virus), TSV (Taura syndrome) and IHHNV (infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus).

 

5. I have to wonder just how large this market might be and how it might be limited by delivery logistics, especially in Southeast Asia.

 

The market potential is the same as it is for Artemia cysts.  Our nauplii production centers will be strategically placed in central locations, and we will be able to service hatcheries/customers within a 100 kilometer range.

 

6. Have any of the big hatcheries in Thailand adopted I&V Bio’s product?

 

Our customer list is proprietary, so we cannot name any particular customer.  I&V Bio has already developed business with large and medium-sized hatcheries in Thailand that understand the benefits of clean, Vibrio-free nauplii, including its savings in energy and labor costs.

 

Information: Frank Indigne, I&V Bio Co., Soi Moo Ban Silawadee, Moo 5, Tamboon Samed, Amphur Muang, Chonburi 20000, Thailand (phone 66-81-846-2901, email frank@iandv-bio.com, webpage http://www.iandv-bio.com).

 

Information: Durwood Dugger, President, BioCepts International, Inc., 947 Sandpiper Lane, Vero Beach, Florida 32963, USA (phone 772-332-1046, fax 772-234-8966, email dugwood@gmail.com, webpage http://www.biocepts.com).

 

Sources: 1. Email to Shrimp News International from Durwood Dugger (above).  Subject: I&V Bio.  August 15, 2013.  2. Email to Shrimp News International from Frank Indigne (above).   Subject: Questions.  August 23, 2013.

 

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