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November 21, 2013

United States

Arizona—EMS Test Kits, India EMS Update and Another Bad Vibrio

 

Undercurrent News reports: In January 2014, GeneReach Biotechnology Corp. in Taiwan is expected to release an IQ2000 test kit that will detect EMS/AHPND (early mortality syndrome/acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease).

 

Dr. Donald Lightner, the University of Arizona scientist responsible for discovering the pathogen that causes EMS/AHPND, said: “We’ve been working on it since maybe July or August 2013, and we released it to GeneReach Biotechnology Corp. on October 17, 2013.  They haven’t had it very long, and it will probably take them two or three months...before they’ll have some kits ready for marketing.”

 

Lightner said other companies might follow suit.  “I don’t think they want exclusive rights, so it will be available to other companies.”

 

The test method, called “polymerase chain reaction” (PCR), can amplify bits of the bacterial genome into billions of copies, “and this makes it easier to detect the disease,” Lightner said.

 

Lightner expects that the test will be most useful with broodstock and postlarvae, but he said rapid detection of EMS/AHPND in ponds is another possibility.  “A farmer could send some samples off to a lab and have an answer back in a day or two,” he said.  “The decision could then be made on whether to try antibiotic therapy or do...what they do with foot and mouth disease, which would be detect and slaughter.”

 

 

India EMS Update

 

Lightner’s lab has received a set of samples from India to test for EMS, but he is not ready to release the results yet.  “It is too early to tell [if its EMS/AHPND],” he said.  Meanwhile, reports of high mortality rates in India are streaming in to USA offices with speculation that EMS is to blame.

 

India’s Marine Product Development Authority will be the authority on whether EMS is in India or not, and until it gives a definitive answer, the verdict is out, one USA shrimp supplier with ties to India said.

 

New Developments

 

On The Shrimp List, a mailing list for the shrimp farming industry,Scott Horton (guategringo@gmail.com) reported: We have found some sick animals that only have Vibrio owensii, which makes me worry that we can’t culture bacteria correctly—or that we have another bad Vibrio.

 

Linda Nunan (lmn@email.arizona.edu), an Assistant Staff Scientist, at Dr. Lightner’s lab at the University of Arizona, responded: Hi Scott, I have now heard from two sources that V. owensii is associated with EMS.

 

Information: Linda Nunan, Assistant Staff Scientist, Department of Veterinary Science and Microbiology, The University of Arizona, Building 90, Room 102,1117 East Lowell Street, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA (phone 1-520-621-4438, email lmn@email.arizona.edu, webpage http://microvet.arizona.edu/research/aquapath/index.htm).

 

Information: Donald V. Lightner, Professor, Department of Veterinary Science and Microbiology, The University of Arizona, Building 90, Room 102,1117 East Lowell Street, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA (phone 1-520-621-4438, fax 1-520-621-4899, email dvl@email.arizona.edu, webpage http://microvet.arizona.edu/research/aquapath/index.htm).

 

Information: Dr. Pei-Yu Alison Lee, GeneReach Biotechnology Corp., No. 19, Keyuan 2nd Road, Central Taiwan Science Park, Taichung, 407 Taiwan (phone 886-4-24639869, fax 886-4-24638255, email peiyu329@genereachbiotech.com, webpage http://www.iq2000kit.com/news_detail.php?gid=2&nid=30).

 

Sources: 1. Undercurrent News.  Editor, Tom Seaman (undercurrent@undercurrentnews.com).  Lightner Releases EMS Detection Test, Expects Industry Adoption in January.  Jeanine Stewart (jeanine.stewart@undercurrentnews.com).  November 20, 2013.  2. The Shrimp List (a mailing list for shrimp farmers).  Subject: AHPND Detection.  November 20, 2013.

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