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November 7, 2015

United States

Washington DC—FDA Refusals October 2015

 

On November 4, 2015, the USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published information on entry line* refusals for the month of October 2015.  Among them were 112 for seafood, including 17 (15.2%) for shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

 

Through the first nine months of 2015, the FDA has now refused a record total of 377 entry lines of shrimp products for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

 

Cumulatively, FDA’s refusals of shrimp in 2015 substantially exceed the agency’s actions over the prior thirteen years.  As the table below indicates, the 377 shrimp refusals in just the first nine months of 2015 exceed the total number of refusals for the six years between 2002 and 2007, the four years between 2008 and 2011, and the three years between 2012 and 2014.

 

   

 

The 17 shrimp refusals involved shipments from six different companies located in India, Malaysia and China.  The refusals were reported from five different FDA District Offices:

 

Kay Kay Exports (India), a company listed on Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans on September 17, 2015, but not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, had two entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with both nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues in the New York District

 

RDR Exports (India), a company listed on Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans on October 9, 2015, but not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with nitrofurans in the Los Angeles District.

 

Ocean Vision, Sdn., Bhd. (Malaysia), a company listed on Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans on June 9, 2015, but not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, had three entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with both nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues in the San Francisco District and two entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with both nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues in the Los Angeles District.

 

Omega Frozen Seafood, Sdn., Bhd. (Malaysia), a company listed on Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans on August 11, 2015, but not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, had two entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with both nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues in the New York District.

 

Ruian Huasheng Aquatic Products Factory (China), a company not currently exempted from Import Alert 16-131 (covering shipments of certain types of aquacultured seafood, including shrimp, from China), had five entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the Baltimore District.

 

Zhousahn Yueyang Food Co., Ltd. (China), a company not currently exempted from Import Alert 16-131 (covering shipments of certain types of aquacultured seafood, including shrimp, from China), had two entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the San Juan (Puerto Rico) District.

 

Beyond the record number of entry line refusals of shrimp from all countries for reasons related to antibiotics, as shown in the chart below, through the first nine months of 2015, the FDA has refused more entry lines of shrimp for antibiotics from India (33) than the agency refused in the previous three years combined (27).

 

   

 

* FDA refusals ‎ are not of shipments; rather they are defined as “entry lines”.  A single container of shrimp shipped to the United States could include multiple entry lines.  For example, a single container of imported shrimp could contain peeled and deveined shrimp (PND) of multiple count sizes.  An importer can break this shipment out into multiple entry lines—PND/31-40/count as one, PND/41-50/count as another and PND/51-60/count as a third.  If all of this shrimp is contaminated with antibiotics and detected by the FDA, then that single container load would be reported as three entry line refusals.

 

An entry line is a type of product in any given container or other method of import.  Example: A container of imported shrimp (40,000 pounds) may have several different types of shrimp within that container such as peeled and deveined, cooked, breaded and headless shell-on.  Each different type of product in that container has its own code and each product is considered an “entry line”.

 

Source: Southern Shrimp Alliance.  FDA Refusals of Shrimp for Antibiotics Increase in October; Agency Has Now Refused More Indian Shrimp Entry Lines for Antibiotics in 2015 Than in Prior Three Years Combined.  November 4, 2015.

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