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Dragon Feeds Work

But Where Can You Buy Them?

 

Shrimp News: In the late 1990s and early 2000s, Dragon Feeds farmed ragworms (polychaetes, Nereis virens) for inclusion in shrimp feeds and shrimp maturation diets.

 

Daniel Gruenberg (seagardenfoods@mac.com): Does anyone on the list know whether Dragon Feeds still manufactures their complete maturation diet for penaeid shrimp?

 

I heard they went through bankruptcy recently.

 

Eric Pinon (list@serviceaqua.com): Daniel, Dragon Feeds is no longer in business.

 

Daniel Gruenberg (seagardenfoods@mac.com): Is there any other proven, fresh, broodstock feed replacement out there?  Breed-S from INVE claims only 70% replacement.

 

Amir Khalil (amir_kh47@yahoo.fr): Hi Daniel, Skretting has registered some hatchery feeds in Thailand, the same ones they are selling in Vietnam, and Bernaqua sells a broodstock feed called “Royal Oyster”.

 

Ulhas Desai (ulhasmdesai@yahoo.co.in): Dear Friends, check out this link http://glassbox-design.com/2010/aquathrive-fish-food-polychaete.

 

Chris Smith (csmith2359@aol.com): Now, Factorweb produces Dragon Feeds.  For information contact Mike Owen at mike.owen@dragonfeeds.com.  Other than the feeds he sells, Mr. Pinon is selective in his comments on the polychaete businesses.

 

Bert Meijering (bert@topsybaits.nl): Dragon Feeds, Dragon Research, Dragon Baits and Factorweb are under police investigation with regards to the disappearance of millions of pounds of aquaculture grant money.  For further information contact Mike Owen at mike.owen@dragonfeeds.com or Chris Smith at csmith2359@aol.com.

 

Bert Meijering (bert@topsybaits.nl): In addition, go to BBC News and search for Dragon Feeds.  [Shrimp News: Click here for the BBC video of Dragon Feeds.  It’s preceded by a short advertisement.]

 

Eric Pinon (list@serviceaqua.com): Dear Mr. Smith, I presume—since you did not sign your name.  Thank you for this sweet comment about myself on your first contribution to this forum.  The information I shared to answer Daniel’s inquiry was given to me by an actual Dragon Feeds, Ltd., shareholder, which I consider a prime source.  It’s public information that Dragon Feeds was forced into liquidation at the beginning of August 2011.

 

I was not aware of the existence of Factorweb.  Obviously this is another company, but it may have retained some former Dragon Feeds’ shareholders or employees.  Why don’t you tell us more about who you are and what you’re doing?

 

Chris Smith (csmith2359@aol.com): Hi Eric, I’m sorry if my comment came over in the manner in which you seem to have taken it.  I just wanted it to be known that there is more than one company producing polychaetes around the world.  It is true that Dragon Feeds was forced into liquidation in 2011, primarily due to the difficulty in getting a huge industry such as aquaculture to take notice of what small companies are capable of, instead of concentrating on the established large ones.  However, the innovative polychaete based products that were researched and developed by Dragon Feeds have continued with Factorweb, and if anyone is interested in finding out more they can use the contact I gave in my earlier comment.

 

Jose Duarte Barboza (joseduartebarboza@yahoo.com): Dear Shrimpers, I´m happy to know that we can still find the Dragon’s maturation feeds.  In 2005, at the University of Wales (Swansea, United Kingdom), I was involved with their research and development, and during 2007-2008, I participated in commercial trials with their feeds on Bonaire Island (Netherlands Antilles).  Beyond their current legal and financial problems, Dragon’s “Supreme Maturation Feeds” were the best dry and semi-moist feeds I’ve ever used for the maturation of Penaeus vannamei.

 

After more than four years of research and multiple tests using different formulations and processing methods—including fresh ragworms—we achieved equal or even better results in fertility and nauplii per female than traditional feeding using fresh/frozen feeds.  We were able to replace at least 85% of all fresh/frozen feed items on a dry basis, except for the frozen squid that was added at 3%/day of broodstock biomass.  In most of countries, squid is the cheapest and most available maturation feed item.  The “Supreme Maturation Feeds” were a big success at some maturation facilities in Venezuela and some Asian Countries.  After that experience, I changed jobs and lost contact with Dragon Feeds.  If you’re interested in receiving additional information, please contact me at the email address above.

 

Sources: 1. The Shrimp List (a mailing list for shrimp farmers).  Subject: Dragon Feeds.  Thursday, January 10, 2013.  2. Summarized by Bob Rosenberry, Shrimp News International, Monday, January 28, 2013.

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